Posts tagged ‘social determinants of health’

An unexpected experience

by Keara Rodela, BA

https://www.flickr.com/photos/stuseeger/

Papel Picado Banners, by Stuart Seeger

I had the pleasure of attending the Third Annual Cultural Inclusion in Social Determinants of Health conference in San Antonio, Texas. The conference was held in the historic Menger hotel, the oldest operating hotel west of the Mississippi and next door to the Alamo. The city of San Antonio was beautiful and festive as I arrived in time for their Fiesta celebration.  During our breaks for lunch and dinner there were bands playing and lots of restaurants to explore.  I am very glad I got to attend the conference in such an inviting place because the conference itself was not what I expected and somewhat of a disappointment.

Social determinants of health (SDoH) are greatly emphasized in our MPH education, and rightly so as these are indicators of health and well-being for our targeted populations.  With that thought, I attended the conference with the idea that I would learn how others are addressing cultural inclusion and SDoH in their work.  I was not prepared for the clinical nature of the presentations and the demographics of the attendees or the lack of cultural inclusion being addressed in the presentations regarding vulnerable populations.  The attendees were made up of clinic nurses, academic nurse educators, or retirees which meant most presentations focused on how to apply cultural inclusion within the academic setting. However, I was expecting presentations on work being done in the field, helping communities of color.

I did find I connected with two of the presenters whose presentations were more aligned with addressing cultural inclusion in the field, and the work they are doing was amazing to hear about.  Although I do not feel I gained much that applied to my own work from attending this conference, I can say that the presenters were knowledgeable about their topics and the attendees were engaged.

As a result of attending this conference, I was able to make a valuable connection with the Keynote speaker and gained a new mentor in the area of MCH and reproductive health.  Although the conference overall was not what I had expected, I recognize there was a professional benefit from attending and am appreciative of the chance to go.

Keara Rodela is a Community Health Worker and second-year MPH student and CEMCH Scholar, with a focus in Maternal and Child Health and health disparities. 

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June 7, 2016 at 11:05 am Leave a comment

Undoing Racism

Last week, the Tulane MCHLT hosted an “Undoing Racism” workshop for students, staff, faculty, and MCH partners, in an effort to better understand and address a key determinant of health.

By Liz Hasseld, BA

It’s been about a week since I attended a three-day workshop titled Undoing Racism, presented by the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond. That title packs a punch – I know! I learned galaxies in those three days and I am excited to apply my new knowledge and perspective as I move forward in public health. I feel very lucky to have participated in this workshop at the start of my career in Maternal and Child Health.

Being a reflexive learner was vital to this type of education. The workshop was three days long, we were in the same room, and barely moved from our chairs. But I was never bored. The hours went by quickly even though I was mostly listening. I think the time passed so quickly for me because we were talking about race, something that is taboo or impolite or often shifted to other issues in conversation with friends or discussion in class. It is rarely discussed as a stand-alone topic in mainstream settings. The first day the presenters (organizers) discussed some ground rules with the group. One rule was to focus on race in United States, and to not bring up classism or sexism. At first I was a little reluctant about that rule – isn’t intersectionality what it’s all about these days? But after the three days I understood why that rule was vital. Without it, the issue of race would become hidden behind other issues and other words. It is usually the last thing to be discussed – it never gets the time or attention it deserves. We were taught the historical beginnings of race and about the laws and policies that have built up the system we have today, with Blacks as second class citizens. We examined the widespread social policies starting from the founding of the United States that benefited White Americans (“White Affirmative Action”) like the Homestead Act, The New Deal and The GI Bill, leaving Black Americans out directly and indirectly. White Americans have had a much longer time and much more government backing to build up wealth and assets that are evident today.

The title to the workshop gave me false hope of unveiling all the answers to cure our country and ourselves of systemic racism. What I gained was far more powerful. The best way I can describe my experience – which was truly life changing – is that it lifted blinders off my eyes that I’d had on since I was born. Ideas of privilege and systemic racism were not new concepts to me (I, a White female, went to a liberal arts school after all!). I was aware of the facts and figures, individual stories of struggle, unfair media portrayals of people of color, and health disparities that exists in this country but I have never put all the pieces together into a philosophy that unites people. Beyond creating programs and engaging in superficial community engagement, public health professionals need to be involved within their own community to break down a system of oppression – meaning that, I, as a public health professional, can’t leave the office for the day and expect my program to change the current system. It will take honest communication and my favorite, community organizing. There is no clear path or way to “undo racism” but it must start from inside my own community – not from an ivory tower or a board room in a skyscraper. This may seem obvious but it was a really good reminder to me as higher education tends to slowly morph people into type A technocrats whether we like it or not!

Although public health is full of compassionate people who want to help others we must try to see a bigger picture. We have professionalized traditional duties of the community to give ourselves jobs. Although we mean well, this practice takes power away from the communities we are meant to help. So we should cut all social programs and let everyone fend for themselves? No. This idea can be dangerously mistaken for a neoconservative view that individuals should be left to pull themselves up by their bootstraps, free of big government. That is absolutely not what I am advocating for. The point is that there is no pre-subscribed and clean data-driven answer. The answers will only come from honest dialogue, courage to ask difficult questions, and an awareness of our own place in this racist system.  Perhaps the workshop left me with more questions than answers. These questions might take a career or a lifetime to answer. These questions are uncomfortable. They raise into question my country, my identity, and my history. The solution to these difficult questions is to keep asking and talking – not to shut down with grief or rejection. So I look ahead with hope and humility. I am going to try my best to remember everything from those three days.

Liz Hasseld, an MCHLT Scholar, will be graduating in Summer 2015 with an MPH concentrating in Maternal and Child Health. Her interests include migrant and refugee health, reproductive health, and achieving health equity through policy. As an ESFJ, she loves to travel and meet new people and is slowly teaching herself Spanish.

May 21, 2015 at 4:00 pm Leave a comment

Media and Communications Specialist: Deadline 8/13

MAC logo

Job Title Media and Communications Specialist
Location New Orleans, LA, US
Organization Name Global Community Health and Behavioral Science
Posting Summary
The Media and Communications Specialist will be responsible for coordination of the Center’s communications related to our Breastfeeding initiatives and other Center projects. This individual will be responsible for coordination of the Center’s communications for programming directed by the Assistant Director, Breastfeeding Initiatives Program Manager and Research and Evaluation Program Manager. Duties will include writing, editing and updating the MAC website and social media communications for all projects; writing and editing newsletters and any other marketing materials (e.g., brochures); and drafting policy/advocacy briefs for internal and external audiences. The Media and Communications Specialist will provide administrative and operational support such as coordinating meetings, processing invoices and other clerical duties to support daily Center operations.
Minimum Qualifications
-3 years of experience
-Excellent oral, written and communication skills

-Excellent interpersonal skills with strong abilities to work effectively with diverse skill sets and personalities
-Strong organizational skills and capacity to coordinate program activities and staff
-Good computer skills with ability to use Excel and Access
-Demonstrated ability to work independently, attention to detail, strong work ethic, ability to manage multiple tasks in an efficient, professional manner and work cooperatively with a variety of Center partners
-Ability to work under time constraints and meet deadlines
Minimum Education
-Bachelor’s degree
Preferred Qualifications
-Marketing skills
-Publications and/or article-writing skills
-Ability to speak well in front of groups
-Experience with design programs such as InDesign and Photoshop
-Experience with website content management systems (CMS)

 

Apply online here

 

August 9, 2014 at 10:00 am Leave a comment

Episode Screening- RACE 2/14

The MCHLT will be screening the third and final segment of the documentary RACE – the Power of an Illusion by California Newsreel, in the GCHB large conference room (2302). You’re welcome to (bring your lunch and) join us.

WHEN: Friday, Feb 14
12-1 pm
WHERE: Tidewater 2302
Tulane School of Public Health & Tropical Medicine

Episode 3- The House We Live In asks, If race is not biology, what is it? This episode uncovers how race resides not in nature but in politics, economics and culture. It reveals how our social institutions “make” race by disproportionately channeling resources, power, status and wealth to white people.

To learn more about the series, visit http://www.pbs.org/race.

February 6, 2014 at 12:05 pm Leave a comment

Place Matters, New Orleans: Student Intern-Social Media

Position Summary:

Place Matters New Orleans (PM-NOLA) is seeking an innovative, politically and social media savvy intern to set-up and manage the PM-NOLA web site, Face Book page, and Twitter Page.  PM-NOLA is a social justice initiative that is aimed at re-shaping policies that impact the health and disparate life-expectancy of New Orleans residents at the neighborhood level. PM-NOLA is focused on youth educational policy change to reduce dropping-out, as high school education completion rates are associated with increased long-term health, increased financial success and lower incarceration rates.  PM-NOLA is interested in a robust community dialogue around these issues and is seeking an ambitious student to manage the social media activities to support this agenda.

Job Location: The intern will be housed at Loyola University.

Supervisor:     Dr. Charles Corprew, Psychological Science, Loyola University

Primary Responsibilities:

  1. Contribute to PM-NOLA website redesign and content.
  2. Monitor and post on all online platforms (blogs, forums, social networks and website.
  3. Conduct online outreach and promotions.
  4. Facilitate PM-NOLA website and social media optimization.
  5. Conduct and establish key word analysis to enhance user search.

Minimum Qualifications:

  1. University student majoring in political science, marketing, English, or communications,
  2. Marketing or business administration with substantial or proven experience on the web and effective use of social media at the organizational level.
  3. Computer skills with proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel, and Access.
  4. Genuine sensitivity to the needs of all children and commitment to youth education.
  5. Professional attitude and manner that reflects the high standards of the PM-NOLA initiative.

 

Desired Skills, Knowledge and Abilities:

  1. Effective verbal and listening communication skills & ability to communicate effectively.
  2. A solid understanding of policy and education issues affecting youth in New Orleans.
  3. Excellent oral and written communication skills, with the ability to translate and direct ideas and posts into positive dialogue.
  4. Good interpersonal skills and the ability to work well in a team.
  5. Strong attention to detail.
  6. Ability to think proactively and function independently
  7. Personal Attributes: honest, trustworthy, and respectful, possess cultural awareness and sensitivity, flexibility, demonstrate sound work ethics.
  8. Should possess basic knowledge of the Place Matters initiative and be able to articulate program goals.

Compensation: Interns will be expected to log 15-20 hours per week during their tenure and compensated at $10 per hour.

Posting Date:  Opens August 26, 2012 and closes September 16, 2013.

Application Instructions: E-Mail questions, cover sheets and resumes to OrleansPlaceMatters@gmail.com

September 3, 2013 at 2:01 pm Leave a comment

Place Matters, New Orleans: Student Administrative Intern

Position Summary:

Place Matters New Orleans (PM-NOLA) is seeking an ambitious, well-organized intern to set-up and manage the PM-NOLA office.  PM-NOLA is a social justice initiative that is aimed at re-shaping policies that impact the health and disparate life-expectancy of New Orleans residents at the neighborhood level. PM-NOLA is focused on youth educational policy change to reduce dropping-out, as high school education completion rates are associated with increased long-term health, increased financial success and lower incarceration rates.  PM-NOLA is interested in a robust community dialogue around these issues and is seeking an ambitious student to manage the office including routing phone calls, maintaining and organizing meetings, keeping minutes, scheduling events, etc.

Location: This intern will housed at Loyola University in an office space to be determined.

Supervisor:     Dr. Charles Corprew, Psychological Science, Loyola University

Primary Responsibilities:

  1. Organize the PM-NOLA office.
  2. Manage and follow-up on phone calls and route callers to the appropriate PM-NOLA Team.
  3. Coordinate PM-NOLA Team meetings.
  4. Maintain meeting notes and facilitate follow-up on meeting and program activities.
  5. Assist with organizing PM-NOLA press releases, publications, issue briefs etc.
  6. Assist with routine programmatic research.

Minimum Qualifications:

  1. University student majoring in business administration, public administration or general studies.
  2. Proven experience with effective administration in non-profit or with a university program.
  3. Computer skills with proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel, and Access.
  4. Genuine sensitivity to the needs of all children and commitment to youth education.
  5. Professional attitude and manner that reflects the high standards of the PM-NOLA initiative.

 

Desired Skills, Knowledge and Abilities:

  1. Effective verbal and listening communication skills & ability to communicate effectively.
  2. Excellent oral and written communication skills, with the ability to translate and direct ideas and posts into positive dialogue.
  3. Good interpersonal skills and the ability to work well in a team.
  4. Strong attention to detail.
  5. Ability to think proactively and function independently.
  6. Personal Attributes: honest, trustworthy, and respectful, possess cultural awareness and sensitivity, flexibility, demonstrate sound work ethics.

Compensation: Interns will be expected to log 15-20 hours per week during their tenure and compensated at $10 per hour.

Posting Date:  Opens August 26, 2012 and closes September 16, 2013.

Application Instructions: E-Mail questions, cover sheets and resumes to OrleansPlaceMatters@gmail.com.

September 3, 2013 at 1:59 pm Leave a comment

KidsWalk Coalition Breakfast Roundtable

Active and Ready to Learn: Transportation’s Role in Creating Healthy and Academic Ready Students

Tulane University’s Cowen Institute for Public Education Initiatives and KidsWalk Coalition at the Tulane Prevention Research Center are proud to co-sponsor a free breakfast roundtable discussion about the role transportation plays in the health and academic readiness of New Orleans’ school age children.

Please join us for breakfast and to contribute to an important conversation about creating social change through transportation for better health and academic readiness outcomes for our city’s youth.

*Space is limited. Free breakfast will be served. RSVP required by Noon Monday, July 29, 2013 via eventbrite or phone at 504-658-8045.

When: Tuesday, July 30, 2013, 8:00 AM – 9:30 AM

Where: Propeller: A Force for Social Innovation, 2035 Washington Avenue, Suite 105, New Orleans, LA 70125

Speakers:

  • Kathryn Parker, MPH, Ph.D., Director, KidsWalk Coalition at the Tulane Prevention Research Center
  • Debra Vaughan, Director of Research, Cowen Institute for Public Education Initiatives
  • Shalanda Cole, MBA, Safe Routes to School Coordinator, Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development
  • Mark Jernigan, P.E., PMP, LTC. (Ret.), Director, Department of Public Works, City of New Orleans
  • Cyndi Nguyen, Executive Director, Vietnamese Initiatives for Economic Training
  • Sophia Griffies, Development Specialist, Audubon Charter School

RVSP via Eventbrite:
http://nolaschoolsandtransportation.eventbrite.com/

Special thanks to Propeller: A Force for Social Innovation for the use of its space.

This event is possible through generous support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Active Living by Design Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities program.

July 23, 2013 at 10:31 am Leave a comment

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