Archive for April, 2016

Transforming Neighborhoods and Communities

Several of our MPH students attended the annual meeting of the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs (AMCHP) in April, in Washington, D.C. What follows is a post from one of these attendees.

By Georgena Desrosier, BS

It was after checking in for my flight in January that I received the message that AMCHP was canceled due to a winter storm. I was sad since I have been waiting for two years to attend the conference. Amazingly, they were able to reschedule the conference. Now, having had the opportunity to go to AMCHP, I fully understood why it is such an important conference. AMCHP met all of my expectations and beyond. I was there for the whole conference and enjoyed every minute of it.

The Transforming Health Care for Adolescent and Young Adults: Improving Quality and Access through Innovation and Collaboration skills building session was very insightful. My takeaway points from this session were that adolescents and young adults need to be educated on how to access health care and understand health coverage. Public health can step in to help fill that gap through insurance literacy education. The health care system needs to create a bridge between pediatricians and primary care physicians to help these groups make a successful transition. The other skills building session I attended was Transforming Title V Program Activities and Workforce Development by Incorporating Telehealth Technologies. I already knew about telehealth from a previous project and how it was being used internationally to increase access to care. It has been incorporated in different areas such as maternal and child health, mental health, newborn screenings, and oral health. I learned about the various technologies needing for delivering telehealth.

Prior to the conference, working with America’s Health Rankings report, I was curious to know why Hawaii has been number one for four consecutive years. At the telehealth session, I had the chance to talk to some people from the Hawaii Department of Health. I was so excited about the opportunity. I learned that telehealth has played a part in reaching people in the remote islands who don’t have access to care. Hawaii also has a high health insurance coverage, and employers have to provide health coverage for eligible employees that are employed at least half-time.

Lastly, the other workshops I attended were how the language of maternal and child health has to shift to include fathers and adolescent.  The Alameda County Public Health Department in California shows an excellent example of how that should look by naming their division Maternal Paternal Child Adolescent Health (MPCAH). The Life Course Theory has been integrated into this health department to help improve family health. Healthy families create healthy neighborhoods and communities. A transformation will occur in communities when the health care needs of all members of the family are met. Overall the conference was very beneficial and not only answered some vital questions but also equipped me with newfound knowledge that will assist in helping me to excel in my career goals.

Georgena Desrosier is a second-year MPH student in the Department of Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences concentrating on Community Health Sciences with a certificate in Maternal and Child Health. She plans to graduate in May 2016. Her interests include community health, community engagement, child development, adolescent health, pediatric cancer, HIV, and women’s health. She also loves volunteering at her church and community, Zumba, watching football, and basketball.

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April 28, 2016 at 10:30 am Leave a comment

Realizing the American Dream of Health Equity

Several of our MPH students attended the annual meeting of the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs (AMCHP) in April, in Washington, D.C. What follows is a post from one of these attendees.

By Lauren Cenac, BA

Since I first enrolled at Tulane, it has been clear to me that I want to work in domestic health. Despite the global focus of our MPH program, I have always felt drawn to tackling problems we experience here in the United States. One of the most perplexing issues in this country is the staggering disparity in health outcomes experienced by different groups of people. Whether these differences are influenced by race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, age, gender, or geography, these inequities directly conflict with the principles we, as a nation, idealize as uniquely American.

The gravity of these health disparities was reiterated in many sessions throughout this year’s conference for the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs (AMCHP). During the conference’s opening event, Dr. Michael Lu, head of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, briefly described his family’s journey to the United States as a testament to the strength of American ideals like opportunity, equality, and hard work that are embodied in the American Dream. Despite the fact that his mother had to drop out of school during the 5th grade, his family’s immigration to the U.S. gave him access to the social mobility that allowed him to become the head of a major federal program. His presentation ended with a picture of his two daughters in the Capitol building.

In an era of polarization in American dialogue and politics, it’s important to hear stories like Dr. Lu’s. These tales remind us of the real people behind health statistics. And his family’s story, in particular, helped me remember the focus of my own journey into public health: to create a better, more equitable society for my own daughter. My goal in pursuing my MPH is to help write the narrative in which this country truly realizes the American Dream by ensuring optimal health for all people.

Lauren Cenac is a second-year MPH student and a scholar in the Center of Excellence in Maternal and Child Health at Tulane. She plans to graduate in August 2016 from the Department of Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences with a concentration in Maternal and Child Health. Her interests include prenatal and postpartum care, breastfeeding, and health communication, policy, and research.

April 26, 2016 at 10:29 am Leave a comment

Webinar viewing: “Working Together to Address Lead Exposure in our Communities”

TOMORROW! April 26th, 2016

12 – 1 p.m. CT

Room 1206, Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 1440 Canal Street, New Orleans, LA 70112

Please join the Tulane Center of Excellence in Maternal and Child Health and the Tulane Prevention Research Center for a group viewing of a one-hour webinar sponsored by the American Public Health Association:

Who: David E. Jacobs, PhD, CIH

What: This webinar will provide information about lead exposure, focus on community solutions to lead exposure and provide tools for preventing lead exposure in the home. This webinar will highlight healthy homes interventions and offer ample opportunity for discussion.

For more information, contact Naomi at 504-988-7410 or John at 504-988-2090. To read more about this webinar and the series on lead and public health that APHA is sponsoring, visit https://www.apha.org/events-and-meetings/webinars/lead-and-public-health.

April 25, 2016 at 12:09 pm Leave a comment

Webinar Viewing- Working Together to Address lead Exposure in our Communities

Please join the Tulane Center of Excellence in Maternal and Child Health and the Tulane Prevention Research Center for a group viewing of a webinar sponsored by the American Public Health Association:

Webinar will be shown at Tidewater Building, Room 1206:  1440 Canal St, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA

Webinar details:

Working Together to Address Lead Exposure in our Communities
April 26, 12-1 p.m.
David E. Jacobs, PhD, CIH, Ruth Ann Norton, Kristie Trousdale and Elyse Pivnick

This webinar will provide information about lead exposure, focus on community solutions to lead exposure and provide tools for preventing lead exposure in the home. This webinar will highlight healthy homes interventions and offer ample opportunity for discussion.

April 22, 2016 at 2:40 pm Leave a comment

Believe in Youth-Louisiana Youth Leadership Council (YLC)

IWES is currently seeking young community leaders between the ages of 14 and 18 to join the Believe in Youth-Louisiana Youth Leadership Council (YLC)

 What’s the Youth Leadership Council (YLC)?

The Youth Leadership Council is a year-long leadership program with a 4-day summer training for youth ages 14-18. The YLC works closely with the Believe in Youth-Louisiana program (BY-LA) to raise awareness about adolescent health, including teen pregnancy/HIV/STI prevention as well as mental and emotional wellness. During the summer leadership intensive, council members will receive training around public speaking and communication, advocacy, and community mobilization. Over the course of the school year, the council will meet every two months to discuss and plan outreach events and projects to promote the Believe in Youth-Louisiana positive youth development program. 

The YLC is made up of 12 young leaders who are passionate about bringing teen pregnancy/HIV/STI prevention programming to their local schools and/or communities. The YLC supports the Believe in Youth-Louisiana teen pregnancy prevention program.

 YLC Applicants Must:

  • Be in high school and ages 14-18 as of Fall 2016
  • Be passionate about prevention of teen pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infections
  • Have proven leadership skills and an ability to work well in a group
  • Experience with the use of social networking and social media tools such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and/or Tumblr
  • Be able to work respectively with a wide range of groups including LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, transgender, and queer) persons, people of different cultural, religious, racial, and political backgrounds, and people with disabilities

Applications are due April 29th by 5pm

Click HERE to apply online, EMAIL your application, or MAIL your application to 

The Institute of Women & Ethnic Studies 

935 Gravier Street, Suite 1140

New Orleans LA, 70113. 

 

If you have any questions please contact Tracey Spinato or call 504.599.7712

April 20, 2016 at 9:04 am Leave a comment

The Well-Woman Project – call for submissions

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The Well-Woman Project funded by Kellogg and being implemented by the UIC-School of Public Health and CityMatCH is gathering women’s stories about the conditions and situations in their lives that make it easy or challenging to receive preventive health care and attend well-woman visits. We now have a new way for women to share their stories – the quick response—which gives women an opportunity to go to our website and leave a short statement about their experiences rather than a complete story.

These stories will be used to create a variety of tools to improve access to well-woman care in 8 cities around the country, as well as nationally. Also, each month, women who participate have a chance  to win a $50 gift card to Walmart or Target.

Now there are three easy ways for women to share!

1) By going to wellwomanstory.org (in English) or mujerbienestar.org (in Spanish) and sharing a “quick response” – one or two sentences about how they experience their health and well-being.
2) By going to wellwomanstory.org and sharing a story.

3) By calling and leaving a message on the 24/7 phone line, 844-221-1893.

April 18, 2016 at 11:08 am Leave a comment

Program Officer – open position

Program Officer (Louisiana/Mississippi), WK Kellogg Foundation: Serving under the direction of the director of or VP for program strategy, the program officer is responsible for identifying and nurturing opportunities for affecting positive systemic change within communities, and executing programming efforts that are aligned with the organizational direction. The program officer will work closely with other staff to ensure integration and coordination of efforts.

Click “more” to read more…”

(more…)

April 13, 2016 at 12:00 pm Leave a comment

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